Monthly Archives: July 2017

The Laws of Wellness

All of which has led to this moment-the time when I offer the universe Ardell’s two laws of REAL wellness.

Ardell’s 1st Law of REAL Wellness: Random Chance, Natural Selection and Contingencies Trump All Else

Life’s largest events often follow random, seemingly inconsequential small actions of which we remain unaware. Secular rational freethinkers place stock in knowledge, commitment, reason and persistence in shaping and fine-tuning lifestyle habits. We embrace perspectives and behaviors on matters existential and otherwise designed to render positive states of enjoyment and well-being. We consciously seek happiness, freedom, physical fitness, love, mutually satisfying relationships and multiple skills. What matters most, what affects our successes and outcomes, appears more or less to be under our field of control. Alas, this functional and preferred way of thinking is largely illusory. There are three far more consequential realities not under your influence in any way. Furthermore, these three factors render the quality and duration of your existence unpredictable and unknowable. They are: 1) random chance or fortune; 2) natural selection; and 3) contingencies.

Ardell’s 2nd Law of REAL Wellness: Relative to Ardell’s 1st Law of REAL wellness, other REAL wellness laws don’t amount to much.

Considering the immense black hole power of the first law, additional such laws play a modest role in efforts to shape life quality and longevity. But, that does not obviate the case for added laws of REAL wellness. The fact is that most of the eponymous laws on the books are useless to most people but are yet of interest and even helpful for a few. I’m in my eighth decade; I’m not aware of any occasion when I would have benefited from an awareness of Aitken’s law or Zipf’s law. I heard of neither until I began the research for this essay. Ditto tons of other laws. Relative to the 1st law above, this law and those that follow do not amount to much. Nevertheless, I hereby offer a few more, just the same. They can’t hurt.

Ardell’s 3rd Law of REAL Wellness: Finding your passion is fine but keep going-become great at it.

Since few of us enjoy royal lineage or handsome trusts that assure first-class travel in life with little or no need for labor, we must choose trades of sorts to pay our way through life. Thus, we are wise to adopt a long-term goal of studying and laboring at a trade that will prove enjoyable and satisfying, as well as properly remunerative. Start by following varied interests and, after years and years if not decades of trial and error, settle into one of them, immersing yourself in it. Be somewhat realistic but guard against premature realism-while not everyone can get elected, be in the movies or play in the NBA or NFL, a select few can. Focus on what excites talents and gifts. Put in the time required to qualify for Carnegie Hall. The goal here is that at some point in your career somebody, somewhere, for some good or strange reason, will pay you to do what you enjoy doing-because you are so spectacular at whatever it is you have honed to a level of artful mastery.

The Law of Attraction

This article aims to debunk the seven biggest myths currently circulating about the Law of Attraction and bring some clarity to the subject.

1. The Law of Attraction is magic

The Myth: “Law of Attraction advocates will tell you that all you have to do is think positively and the stuff you want will just come to you. Obviously this is wrong, since things like money, cars and houses don’t just appear out of thin air.”

The Myth Debunked: No one with a true understanding of the Law of Attraction has ever claimed that if you just think a positive thought, a house with a million dollars on the kitchen table and a Ferrari in the driveway will just drop out of the sky right in front of you. This is usually a quote used by people trying to claim that the Law of Attraction is a scam. But the quote isn’t true. That isn’t how the Law of Attraction works at all. The Law of Attraction doesn’t just literally drop stuff in your lap. It brings you meetings with just the right people at the right time, brilliant ideas and coincidences. It’s your job to pay attention to those ideas, follow your hunches and recognize the coincidences.

2. All you have to do is visualize

The Myth: “The Law of Attraction is just about visualization. That’s why they tell you to create vision boards and the like. You’re supposed to stare at the things you want and they will just come to you (see Myth #1)”

The Myth Debunked: This one is partially true. Visualization can be a valuable tool you use to train yourself to create what you want. It isn’t the visualization that creates, though. You create through the vibration that you offer. The vibration you offer is determined by the thoughts you habitually think (beliefs). Visualization can help you to retrain your thoughts, but there’s much more to it than that. If you visualize a beautiful car, but have the belief that you’ll never get a car like that, you can visualize all day, every day, and that car’s not going to show up. You can tell by the way you feel when you visualize. If it feels really, really good to visualize the car, and the entire visualization is positive, you’re doing well. If, however, it feels a bit off and your visualization takes a bit of a negative turn, you’ve just uncovered some negative beliefs.

3. The Law of Attraction is new

The Myth: “If the Law of Attraction is really a law, why hasn’t anyone discovered it before? This is just some new fad.”

The Myth Debunked: The Law of Attraction isn’t new. It’s been around since the beginning of, well, everything. It can be argued that it’s the oldest law in the Universe. The reason that so many people are hearing about it now, is because more and more people are waking up and realizing, or at least getting a glimpse of, who they really are. More people are asking for this information than ever before, and therefore, the Law of Attraction must bring them more answers than ever before. There are more books written on this subject than we’ve ever seen. Thanks to the internet, people can find answers to their questions immediately.

The Future of Law School

The demand for law school and the government subsidization of school led to the growth of the school industry, aided by publications like U.S. News with its ludicrous school rankings. Schools became financial profit centers of universities (like successful sports programs) and in many cases were required to kick back money to the central university administration to help underwrite the rest of the less profitable parts of the university. The costs were passed onto recent graduates and, ultimately, the legal consumer in the form of high legal fees, especially in corporate law.

Who benefited? One of the beneficiaries was the law school faculty. The typical faculty member at a decent law school has next to no practical experience. The person went to a top law school, practiced for a year or two, and then went out into the legal academy job market at the age of 28 or 29 to get a faculty job. A few law professors keep up their practical skills by performing pro bono legal work, or by consulting on the side.

Most law professors know precious little about what it means to be a lawyer, and they’re actually proud of this. That’s because the rest of the university has always looked at law schools (and business schools) as essentially trade schools. Since law professors don’t want to think they’re engaged in a massive Vocational Technical school, they try to distance themselves from the practice of law.

Second, the actual curriculum associated with law school has changed little from the 1930s, when it focused on 19th century common law concepts or ancient tort or property law ideas. These principles have very little to do with the basic way property, tort, or criminal law is practiced in modern America. Most of these laws are statutory, not common law, anyway. As if to excuse their woefully inadequate ability to train lawyers, law professors and law school deans love to tell incoming students that they don’t teach you how to be a lawyer, they train you how to think like a lawyer through the Socratic Method.

Of course “thinking like a lawyer” is a silly concept. All it really means is thinking carefully about an issue. Yes, it requires a little bit of discipline. But it is not difficult, and does not require three years of school. The Socratic Method – the one that was made famous by John Houseman’s Professor Kingsfield in The Paper Chase – is also bunk. Most professors don’t do it well. And all it amounts to is asking pointed questions and hypotheticals about something that was just read, and will soon be forgotten.

The problem with the Law School – which has almost always been ineffective at training lawyers – is that it has a built in constituency – the law professor – who is going to fight like heck to keep his or her privileged position. Law school has been experiencing a boom in the past 4 years, as routinely happens when the economy takes a dive. That’s because rather than go out into an uncertain job market, a lot of young recent college grads (and even mid-career professionals) decide to go to school in the hopes of improving their employability.

The Forgotten Laws

People can live a fulfilling life achieving what they want to achieve if they live in harmony with these laws.

  • The Law of Thinking

The law of thinking dictates that we can only attract what we think. By changing your conscious thought patterns, which is your ruling state, you will allow yourself to effectively change the result to what you want. How far a person can go or how great the success a person can have, depends on the thinking. In order to achieve big success, a person has to think big. When you think success, you will attract success.

  • The Law of Supply

The law of supply depicts that the universe is a source of unlimited supply. It is enough for everyone. If we focus on abundance, our feeling, emotions and actions eventually attract abundance into our live. It is possible to achieve success in any area you are doing if you release yourself from the belief of scarcity. The universe does not restrict or limit on what we could achieve, but we do if we allow it.

  • The Law of Attraction

The law of attraction essentially is about what we focus, we will attract. Everything we experience in our life is dictated by our own mindset. If you’re a positive thinker, the universe will respond in harmony with you and you will get what you desire. So, it is important to just focus on thinking about what you want and get emotionally involved to attract it into your life.

  •  The Law of Receiving

The law of receiving works hand in hand with giving. We must give in order to receive. However, we need to let go and not being attached to what we want to receive too obsessively. We need to trust the universe will somehow give us what we want and all we need to do is to be ready to receive it. How much we receive will be limited by how much we allow it.

  • The Law of Increase

The law of increase is about being happy and being grateful for what we have now. At the same time, we need to have faith that we can grow and have more of it. The key to this law is to feel grateful, to praise for the good things and amplify the positive things that we have in life. The more you appreciate and look at the good sides of things, the more you will reap. This is because as you are appreciating the good things, you build yourself the momentum to move ahead to get more and more in life.

  • The Law of Compensation

This law is all about space or vacuum. According to Bob Proctor, universe fills up the empty space or vacuum with the things that we desire, but first we will need to create a space for it to happen. We need to constantly focus and energize the good things in order to get the outcome that we want to achieve. The invisible energy of the thinking substance that we radiate will be heard and we will get what we want.

  • The Law of Non-Resistance

Every thought has a frequency. The less you resist on something, the less it will exist. By devoting less attention towards fighting the unwanted thoughts and conditions, you will find that the problems that you face become less and less pervasive. In pursuing success, you’ll encounter resistance along the way. By not focusing on the resistance,