Work Hour Laws

Work hours, pay issues, questions, oh my! As a small business owner or manager, the requirements governing meal break laws and other compensation issues can seem trickier than traveling the Yellow Brick Road. My FAQ guide to work hours and pay issues, which are governed by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), will help you sort it all out:

How many hours are required for full-time and part-time employment?

Full-time or part-time employment rules are generally determined by the employer and not by Department of Labor laws.

Are there laws about compensating for breaks and meal periods?

Although the FLSA doesn’t require employers to give time off for breaks or meals, some states may have their own meal break laws. When employers do offer short breaks, federal law dictates that employees must be compensated. Work break laws also say that employers do not need to compensate for meal breaks.

Are there Department of Labor laws regarding flexible schedules?

The FSLA does not govern flexible work schedules, which are typically defined as those that allow personnel to vary arrival and/or departure times. Flexible work schedules are often considered a matter between the employer and the employee.

How can I make sure I’m compliant with vacation pay rules?

Employers aren’t required to pay employees for time not worked. That includes vacations and sick leave as well as holidays. Since there is no federal vacation pay law, paid time off is a matter between the employer and the employee.

Is there a sick leave entitlement?

Although employers are not required to pay for sick leave, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) says that covered and eligible employees are entitled to up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for certain medical situations that affect the worker or a member of the employee’s immediate family.

Non-compliance can be worse than the Wicked Witch of the West.

The Wicked Witch may have had her band of flying monkeys, but the Department of Labor can make non-compliance a costly and time-consuming nightmare for your small business. Know the ins and outs of employment law, from vacation pay rules to sick leave payment, so you can make the management decisions that build a strong and profitable business. If you’re a small business owner or manager with questions about your obligations regarding Department of Labor laws, this guide will give you answers. From guidelines about job sharing policy to last paycheck laws, here is Part II of my frequently asked questions guide to work hours and other pay issues.

Are there travel time laws I need to be aware of?

Any time spent traveling during normal working hours is considered work time, which means employees must be compensated. While travel time generally doesn’t include commuting time, it does include, for example, time spent traveling to and from a client’s office.

How do I know if I’m required to provide hazard pay?

Hazard pay is additional compensation for work involving physical hardship or for performing a hazardous duty. Physical hardship is defined as any work that causes extreme physical discomfort or distress that’s not relieved by protective devices. The law doesn’t specifically require employers to provide hazard pay except as a part of “a federal employee’s regular rate of pay in computing employee’s overtime pay.